Sample NGSS

Created by Cassie Soeffing Last updated 3/4/2016

Resources in NASAWavelength.org for the following Performance Expectations:
MS-ESS3-2 - Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects.

MS-ESS3-3 - Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

  • Science Practices - MY NASA DATA

    Within the science education community, there is a shift in focus from content driven instruction to that of the processes and practices associated with the acquisition of scientific knowledge. MY NASA DATA serves as a resource to bring to the classroom and the general public the ability to acquire scientific knowledge by engaging in the process and practice of real-world science experiences using NASA data.
  • Does Air Have Weight?

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions. ----- Earth Science Does Air Have Weight? This experimental activity is designed to develop an understanding that air has mass. Students conduct an investigation and observe the change in the position of a bar balancing a balloon inflated with air on one end and a uninflated balloon on the other end. Resources needed include a piece of wood, two rubber balloons, two large paper clips, ruler, nail, hammer and tape. The resource includes background information, teaching tips and questions to guide student discussion. This is chapter 7 of Meteorology: An Educator's Resource for Inquiry-Based Learning for Grades 5-9. The guide includes a discussion of learning science, the use of inquiry in the classroom, instructions for making simple weather instruments, and more than 20 weather investigations ranging from teacher-centered to guided and open inquiry investigations.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/E4
  • Calculating Relative Air Mass

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions. --------In this activity, students work in teams to calculate relative air mass and demonstrate how solar elevation angle affects the intensity of light that reaches an observer on the ground. The resource includes a student data sheet. It is part of the Atmosphere chapter of the GLOBE Teacher's Guide, and is supported by the GLOBE Aerosol protocol. GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9C/M9, 9C/H1
  • Learning to Use Visualizations

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----In this activity, students work in teams to calculate relative air mass and demonstrate how solar elevation angle affects the intensity of light that reaches an observer on the ground. The resource includes a student data sheet. This learning resource is part of the Atmosphere chapter of the GLOBE Teacher's Guide, and is supported by the GLOBE Aerosol protocol. GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9A/M8
  • Weather & Climate iQuest

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions. ----- This IQuest allows students to explore weather and climate concepts through a tour of related websites and videos. Students will examine NASA's role in both gathering weather and climate data and monitoring the changes to each that are occurring globally. Links to specific sites- along with accompanying worksheets- are included.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4B/M14
  • MY NASA DATA: Analysis of Atmospheric Conditions for a High Mountain Retreat

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----Using weather data from both satellite and ground-based observations, this lesson challenges students to select a site location for a hypothetical mountain retreat. Students must determine and then justify a building site after gathering, graphing and analyzing two sources of data on altitude, atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity. To conclude the lesson, students defend their choice in a formal site recommendation letter to the "retreat developers." This lesson uses student- and citizen science-friendly microsets of authentic NASA Earth system science data from the MY NASA DATA project. It also includes related links, extensions, an online glossary, and data analysis tools
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/H5, 12B/H4, 3A/M2
  • MY NASA DATA: Atmospheric Pressure vs. Elevation

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----n this data activity, students use NASA satellite measurements of atmospheric pressure to learn that pressure decreases with height in the atmosphere. Step-by-step instructions for use of the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) guide students through selecting a data set, importing the data into a spreadsheet, creating graphs, and analyzing data plots. The lesson provides detailed procedures, related links and sample graphs, follow-up questions, extensions, and teacher notes. Designed for student use, MY NASA DATA LAS samples micro datasets from large scientific data archives, and provides structured investigations engaging students in exploration of remotely-sensed data to answer real world questions.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9B/M3, 12C/M2
  • MY NASA DATA: A Comparison of Land and Water Temperature

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. ------This lesson investigates seasonal changes in Earth's land and water temperatures by examining satellite data. Students will compare and analyze temperature changes of both water and land over a one-year period. This lesson uses student- and citizen science-friendly microsets of authentic NASA Earth system science data from the MY NASA DATA project. It also includes lesson links, extensions, and an online glossary.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/H3, 12B/H4, 4B/H2
  • MY NASA DATA: Creating Climographs

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----Students use NASA satellite data to compare surface temperature and precipitation of different islands in the Pacific Ocean. Students will create climographs for the island of Guam and 2 other islands using the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server as a resource. Step-by-step instructions for use of the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) guide students through selecting a data set, importing the data into a spreadsheet, creating graphs, and analyzing data plots. The lesson provides detailed procedures, related links and sample graphs, follow-up questions, extensions, and teacher notes. Designed for student use, MY NASA DATA LAS samples micro datasets from large scientific data archives, and provides structured investigations engaging students in exploration of real data to answer real world questions.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/M9, 4B/M14, 9B/M3, 12C/M2, 12D/M5
  • MY NASA DATA: Patterns in High Cloud Coverage

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----Students will plot and analyze a time series of data for high cloud coverage from a specified location (home or school) and determine whether or not a seasonal pattern exists. The lesson includes step-by-step instructions for use of the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS), guiding students through selecting a data set from a location of their choice, importing the data into a spreadsheet, creating graphs, and analyzing data plots. The lesson provides detailed procedures, related links and sample graphs, follow-up questions, extensions, and teacher notes. Designed for student use, MY NASA DATA LAS samples micro datasets from large scientific data archives, and provides structured investigations engaging students in exploration of real data to answer real world questions.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9B/M3, 12C/M2
  • MY NASA DATA: How Much Water is Available in the Atmosphere for Precipitation?

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. ----- This lesson explores the relationship between the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere available for precipitation and actual precipitation levels. After accessing and graphing the satellite data on both water vapor and precipitation levels, students will examine, compare and interpret monthly, seasonal, yearly and/or global patterns. This lesson uses student- and citizen science-friendly microsets of authentic NASA Earth system science data from the MY NASA DATA project. It also includes sample graphs, related links, extensions, an online glossary, and data analysis tools.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 12B/H4, 4B/M7
  • Hurricane Katrina

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. ----- This problem-based learning module asks students to consider how future climate change could impact the frequency and intensity of hurricanes. They are tasked with studying the trends and impacts of hurricanes on coastal regions. They proceed by conducting an Earth system analysis, examining connections and causal chains of impact that are set in motion by the hurricane throughout the Earth's atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere. Teacher notes, rubric, and background resources are included. The student pages are available as a separate page that can be printed or displayed on a computer.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/E5, 3C/H4
  • Identifying the Key Changing Conditions of the Earth System (Grades 7-9)

    MS-ESS2-5 - Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions. -----This unit consists of four activities. Students begin by examining temperature cycles (current, recent and historical) then add in factors such as carbon dioxide, precipitation and cloud cover to discover regional and global differences in the effects of climate change. The unit is one of four under the Chicago Botanic Garden curriculum entitled, "Climate Change in My Backyard."
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/M14, 4C/M7
  • Earth System Responses to Natural and Human-Induced Changes (Grades 7-9)

    MS-ESS3-3 - Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment. ----- This unit consists of five activities, all of which focus on the response of plant life-cycle events to climate change. Students participate in discussions, field observations, data collection and analyses, plant identification, seed dispersal comparisons, and graphing and analyses of plant phenology (timing of life-cycle events). Project BudBurst, a citizen science project which studies the impact of climate change on phenology, is integrated into this unit. The unit is one of four under the Chicago Botanic Garden curriculum entitled, "Climate Change in My Backyard."
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/M14, 4C/M7, 5D/M3
  • Exploring Relationships Among Variables in a Particular Month

    MS-ESS3-3 - Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment. ----- In this activity, student teams explore the connections between parts of the Earth system by examining a time series of environmental data maps. They observe that the environment is the result of the interplay among many processes that take place on varying time and spatial scales, by looking at different six different variables during a single month: insolation, surface temperature, cloud fraction, aerosols, precipitation and biosphere (surface vegetation). This is one of six interrelated learning activities in the student activity guide associated with the GLOBE Earth System Poster, Exploring Connections in Year 2007. A series of assessment and extension activities are included. GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program. GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program. This resource is located on page 7 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9A/M8, 9D/H6a, 4B/H3
  • Discovery Area

    MS-ESS3-3 - Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment. ----- In this simulation exercise, students determine where to place a hosptial using a classified land cover map to make environmentally sound land use decisions. Results are presented in a mock town hall meeting. A student worksheet is included within this activity. This is a learning activity associated with the GLOBE land cover/biology investigations and is supported by the Land Cover/Biology chapter of the GLOBE Teacher's Guide. GLOBE (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on, K-12 school-based science education program.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 12E/H6b
  • Predicting the Consequences of Changes for Human Civilization (Grades 7-9)

    MS-ESS3-3 - Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment. ----- Earth Science Predicting the Consequences of Changes for Human Civilization (Grades 7-9) This unit focuses on the impacts of climate change on humans. Students participate in activities using "Character Cards" (included with the unit). The cards introduce fictitious citizens who describe the local economic, social and political factors that impact their country's climate change issues/responses. A second activity in the unit has students research, discuss and present their findings on the impacts of climate change - first at the global level then narrowed to a country, region and/or state level. In addition, students examine how their own energy and food choices impact climate change and then propose ideas to reduce their carbon footprint. The unit is one of four under the Chicago Botanic Garden curriculum entitled, "Climate Change in My Backyard."
    AAAS Benchmarks: 7D/M2, 7F/M3, 7G/M5
  • Hurricanes

    MS-ESS3-2 - Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects. ----- The emphasis of this lesson is deepening students' understanding of how and why we measure precipitation across the globe. Students will look at NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data gathered during hurricanes and how this data can prove essential in helping scientists forecast the amount of precipitation. Students will also learn how the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is enabling scientists to collect new information on hurricanes. The lesson uses the 5E instructional sequence.
    AAAS Benchmarks: MS-ESS3-2
  • SOS Water Falls Post-Visit

    MS-ESS3-2 - Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects. ----- Intended for use after viewing the Science on a Sphere film "Water Falls," this lesson deepens student's understanding of global precipitation measurement. Students will explore NASA satellite data gathered during Hurricane Sandy to learn how that data was essential in helping scientists forecast its path and precipitation amounts. All background information, student worksheets and images/photographs/data are included in these downloadable sections: Teacher’s Guide, Student Capture Sheet, Assessment and PowerPoint Presentation.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4B/M7
  • How Close Is Safe? Buffer Zone Development

    MS-ESS3-2 - Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects. ----- Earth Science How Close Is Safe? Buffer Zone Development The effects of volcanoes on both the environment and people are the focus of this investigation. Students are introduced to the term "buffer" and are tasked with creating a possible buffer zone around Mount St. Helens. Students begin by assigning 32 pre-written statements related to volcanoes into categories of cause, effect and human responses. The chart, along with true-color and false-color LandSat images from 1980 and 1999, are used to study the eruption of Mount St. Helens to determine that possible buffer zone. The URL opens to the investigation directory, with links to teacher and student materials, lesson extensions, resources, teaching tips, and assessment strategies. As the first investigation in this module entitled, "Volcanoes- Local Hazard, Global Issue," the teacher's guide will begin with a two-page module overview and list of all standards addressed. This is Investigation 1 of three found in the Grades 5-8 Module 1 of Mission Geography. The Mission Geography curriculum integrates data and images from NASA missions with the National Geography Standards. Each of the three investigations in Module 1, while related, can be done independently. - See more at: http://nasawavelength.org/resource/nw-000-000-003-292#sthash.8mYLP3bz.dpuf
    AAAS Benchmarks: 1A/E2, 4C/P2, 4C/M1
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