NASA's Universe of Learning Science Briefing: October 2018

Created by Emma Marcucci Last updated 10/2/2018

The resources in this list pertain to the presentation given on October 4, 2018, titled, "Deaths and Afterlives of Stars".
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NASA's Universe of Learning is a program which will integrate NASA's Astrophysics Science Mission Directorate programs, and will advance STEM learning and literacy by creating and delivering a unified suite of education products, programs, and professional development that spans the full spectrum of NASA Astrophysics.
NASA's Universe of Learning is partnering with the NASA Museum Alliance to provide professional development briefings for the informal science education community. These briefings provide current NASA Astrophysics themes, content, and resources to the informal community. These curated lists present the resources described during the briefings. To find the briefings, you can go here:
http://universe-of-learning.org/science_briefing

  • Gamma Ray Burst Educator Guide

    Gamma Ray Burst Educational Unit: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science and Mathematics
  • Angling for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Activity from Gamma-ray Burst Educator Guide (page 17): In this activity, students determine the direction to a gamma ray burst using the times it is detected by three different spacecraft located somewhere in the solar system. We assume that all the spacecraft are in the plane of the Earth's orbit around the Sun; that is, there is no third dimension and that we are only concerned with two dimensions, x and y. We also assume the burst is billions of light years away, so the incoming gamma rays are traveling along parallel lines. This activity is part of a unit that is designed to use gamma-ray bursts - unimaginably huge explosions that signal the births of black holes - as an engagement tool to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics. The guide is based on the 5E instructional sequence and features background information, assessments, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities. This resource is located on page 17 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4F/H6ab
  • Multi-messenger Astronomy: A New Era in Space Science — Universe of Learning

    November 2017 Science Briefing: Breaking News about Neutron Star Merge. Observing cosmic events in both light and gravitational waves opens a new era of multi-messenger astronomy, and provides insight into the workings of the universe.
  • Multimedia products for LIGO/Virgo Observations

    Multimedia products from the first observation of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral.
  • Sorting out the Cosmic Zoo

    Activity from Gamma-ray Burst Educator Guide (page 8): In this hands-on activity, students analyze the data on Mystery Object Cards, observe that astronomical objects have many observable properties, and discover that these properties allow scientists to categorize astronomical objects into different groupings. Students also discover that, because objects can be grouped in different ways, discrete categorization is not always possible. This is why scientists need time to fully study and understand celestial objects and phenomenon. This activity is part of a unit designed to use gamma-ray bursts - unimaginably huge explosions that signal the births of black holes - as an engagement tool to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics. The guide is based on the 5E instructional sequence and features background information, assessments, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities. This resource is located on page 8 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 1B/M1b, 9B/H4, 1B/H3
  • Gamma Ray Burst Distribution on the Sky: The Plots Thicken

    Activity from Gamma-ray Burst Educator Guide (page 27): In this activity, students look at the distribution of aluminum foil balls arranged in a circle on the floor, and compare them to the distribution of gamma-ray bursts on the sky. This activity is part of a unit designed to use gamma-ray bursts - unimaginably huge explosions that signal the births of black holes - as an engagement tool to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics. The guide is based on the 5E instructional sequence and features background information, assessments, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities. This resource is located on page 27 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 9B/H4
  • Beam Me Up

    Activity from Gamma-ray Burst Educator Guide (page 48): In these activities, students investigate how gamma ray bursts emit energy in beams (as opposed to emitting light in all directions) and investigate the implications of this on the total number of gamma ray bursts seen in the universe. This activity is part of a unit designed to use gamma-ray bursts - unimaginably huge explosions that signal the births of black holes - as an engagement tool to teach selected topics in physical science and mathematics. The guide is based on the 5E instructional sequence and features background information, assessments, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities. This resource is located on page 48 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 11B/H1a
  • Fishing for Supernovae

    Activity from Supernova Educator Guide (page 12): Students will play a card game similar to "go fish" in which they match multi-wavelength images of different supernova remnants. This resource is located on page 12 of the PDF document.
  • The Crawl of the Crab

    Activity from Supernova Educator Guide (page 17): In this activity, students compare two images of the Crab Nebula taken more than 40 years apart. By measuring the motion of some of the knots of glowing gas in the neubla, students will be able to determine the date of the supernova explosion that set the Crab Nebula into motion. This is Activity 2 of the "Supernova Educator's Guide" developed by the XMM-Newton and GLAST E/PO programs. The guide features background information, assessment rubrics, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and alignment to national education standards. Note: In 2008, GLAST was renamed Fermi, for the physicist Enrico Fermi. This resource is located on page 17 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 12C/M3, 11C/H8
  • Magnetic Poles and Pulsars

    Activity from Supernova Educator Guide (page 27): Students investigate magnetic fields in two and three dimensions, and compare the magnetic field of a pulsar to that of the Earth and other astronomical objects. This is Activity 3 of the Supernova Educator Guide developed by the XMM-Newton and GLAST E/PO programs. The guide features extensive background information, assessment rubrics, student worksheets, extension and transfer activities, and detailed information about physical science and mathematics content standards. Note: In 2008, GLAST was renamed Fermi, for the physicist Enrico Fermi. This resource is located on page 27 of the PDF document.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4G/H7
  • Astronomy Activity: Gamma Ray Bursts and Supernova - YouTube

    A demonstration illustrating how Gamma Ray Bursts are detected on Earth. Find more supernova-related activities on the Night Sky Network here: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/download-view.cfm?Doc_ID=275
  • Star Maps: Stars Likely to Go Supernova! | Night Sky Network

    Which stars in the night sky will go supernova? These monthly star chart handouts can help you navigate the night sky to find these giant stars.
  • A Universe Without Supernovae [Game] | Night Sky Network

    This quick, fun game shows players the value of supernovae in the universe. Players discover that almost all elements that make up the Earth and all its living things were made inside stars that go supernova.
  • Stellar Evolution: Our Cosmic Connection

    Stellar Evolution: Our Cosmic Connection In this activity, students use multiwavelength images of stars in different stages of evolution to investigate how the initial masses of the protostars determines their evolutionary paths. Images include stellar nurseries, protostars, supernova remnants, planetary nebulae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars and black holes. The activity includes a teacher guide with background information, a card set of 24 images, student task description and worksheets, online tutorials, and a Web quest version. Suggestions for using the activity in the classroom as well as related URLs are included in the Web-based teacher guide.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/H2cd, 4A/H2ef
  • How to Hold a Dead Star in Your Hand

    Follow the 400 year background story leading to the creation of the first 3D model of a supernova (Cassiopeia A). This article explains how science, mathematics and technology led to the visual representation of data gathered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The model of Cassiopeia A is available free online- allowing you to make your own 3D model.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/H3
  • Supernova Explosions

    In this activity, students are reminded that the Universe is made up of elements and that the heavier elements are created inside of a star. They are then introduced to the life cycle of a star and how a star's mass affects its process of fusion and eventual death. Students discuss the physical concept of equilibrium as a balancing of forces and observe an experiment to demonstrate what happens to a soda can when the interior and exterior forces are not in equilibrium. An analogy is made between this experiment and core collapse in stars, to show the importance of maintaining equilibrium in stars. Finally, students participate in an activity which demonstrates how mass is ejected from a collapsed star in a supernova explosion, thereby dispersing heavier elements throughout the Universe. This activity is part of a series that has been designed specifically for use with Girl Scouts, but the activities can be used in other settings. Most of the materials are inexpensive or easily found. It is recommended that a leader with astronomy knowledge lead the activities, or at least be available to answer questions, whenever possible.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/H2cd, 4A/H2ef