Engage Girls in STEM! A Collection of Activities and Resources

Created by Science4Girls Last updated 3/14/2014

A collection of girl-friendly activities, perfect for use in library environments and other informal educational settings, as well as resources for facilitators. The activities and resources can be used in NASA Science4Girls and Their Families events, a program that partners NASA science educators with libraries to engage girls in STEM. To learn more about this program, visit: http://smdepo.org/topic/5705.

Also, check out the NASA Wavelength Lists: Science4Girls en Español (http://nasawavelength.org/list/312) and Science Storybooks and Activities for Elementary School Children (http://nasawavelength.org/list/323).

  • Afterschool Universe

    Afterschool Universe was created by one of the original NASA Science4Girls science education teams and is excellent in venues such as libraries. This astronomy program is designed for middle school children in out-of-school-time settings. The program explores basic astronomy concepts (like invisible light, telescopes) and focuses on the universe outside the solar system (stars, galaxies, black holes). The program is structured for use in a variety of settings, including astronomy days, summer camps, or year-long afterschool programs. Although session activities build concepts sequentially, each session activity is designed to be freestanding as not all participants may attend every session. A manual provides background information and descriptions of how to conduct each activity. A companion website provides additional information and resources for the program leader.
  • Family Science Night Facilitators Guide

    The 9-session NASA Family Science Night program invites middle school children and their families to discover the wide variety of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics being performed at NASA and in everyday life. Family Science Night programs explore various themes on the Sun, the Moon, the Stars, and the Universe through fun, hands-on activities, including at-home experiments. Information about Family Science Night implementation and support resources, including the facilitator's guide, are available by registering on the Family Science Night Facilitators website (see Related & Supplemental Resources for link).
  • Crater Creations: Moon

    This is an activity about impact craters. Learners will experiment to create impact craters and examine the associated features. Then they observe images of lunar craters and explore how the mass, shape, velocity, and angle of impactors affects the size and shape of the crater. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 4A/M4, 11B/P3, 12D/P1
  • The Scoop on Moon Dirt

    In this two-part activity, learners compare how soil forms on Earth and the Moon. They examine different soil samples and compare them to lunar "soil" simulant. They explore how water, wind, and impactors help to make soil. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M4, 4C/E2, 4C/M2b
  • Moon Pie

    Learners will work in teams to apply their knowledge about the Moon, its environment, and the LRO mission to match responses to Moon questions. With the correct responses, they build a picture of the Moon. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4A/M4, 10A/M2
  • Moon Tune

    This is a lesson about NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Learners will sing about the LRO mission to the Moon, learn that craters on the Moon may harbor water ice, and they discover how LRO is searching for this and other resources needed to build future lunar outposts. This is a good introductory activity. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4A/M4, 10A/M2
  • First Step: Return to the Moon!

    This kick-off activity sets the stage for further explorations and activities in Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries. As a group, learners will discuss what they know about Earth's Moon. They read books to learn more about the lunar environment and history of exploration. They use their knowledge to create a drawing or model of the landscape (optional).
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4A/E4, 4A/M3, 4A/M4, 4B/M5, 10A/M2, 12D/E2
  • Ice Zones: Where We Look for Ice

    In this activity, learners draw conclusions about where on a planetary body scientists might look for ice and why. They use a clay ball, ice cubes, and a heat lamp to model the permanently-shadowed polar regions of planets and moons that may harbor ice. They learn that our Moon, and even Mercury, may have areas with ice. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 4B/M2cd, 4B/M12, 4B/H3
  • Jiggly Jupiter

    Learners will build edible models of Jupiter and Earth to compare their sizes and illustrate their internal layers. They discuss how the Juno mission will infer details about Jupiter's interior by measuring its gravity field and magnetic field. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
  • Weather Stations

    This is a series of seven brief activities about Jupiter's atmosphere and weather. Learners will look at Jupiter's distinct banded appearance, violent storms, and clouds of many different colors. The activities are part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/E3, 4B/E5, 12C/P3
  • Investigating the Insides

    This is an activity about the interiors of planets. Leaners will investigate the composition of unseen materials using a variety of tools - a process that mimics how scientists discover clues about the interiors of planets with cameras and other instruments onboard spacecraft. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
  • Heavyweight Champion: Jupiter

    Learners will weigh themselves on scales modified to represent their weights on other worlds to explore the concept of gravity and its relationship to weight. They consider how their weights would be the highest of all the planets while standing on Jupiter, but their mass remains the same no matter where in the solar system they are. They compare the features of different planets to determine which characteristics cause a planet to have more or less gravity. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 4G/M1, 12C/M3
  • Icebreaker Activity: Is It Alive?

    This is a set of two improv-style activites that encourage participants to participate in learning about living and nonliving things. Learners will get to know each other through an icebreaker activity and state their ideas and previous experience with living versus nonliving things. This will help prepare them to explore how scientists define and look for life in worlds beyond our own. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is the icebreaker activity in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
  • Dunking the Planets

    This is a demonstration about the density of the planets. Learners will compare the relative sizes and masses of scale models of the planets as represented by fruits and other foods. They will then dunk the "planets" in water to highlight the fact that even a large, massive planet - such as Saturn - can have low density. They discuss how a planet's density is related to whether it is mainly made up of rock or gas. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 11B/E4
  • Solar System in My Neighborhood

    Learners will shrink the scale of the solar system to the size of their neighborhood and compare the relative sizes of scale models of the planets, two dwarf planets, and a comet as represented by fruits and other foods. This activity requires access to a large indoor or outdoor space (measuring at least 190 feet wide) where the children can model the orbit of Mercury around the Sun. It is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 11B/E4, 12B/M5
  • The Pull of the Planets

    Learners will model the gravitational fields of planets on a flexible surface. Children place and move balls of different sizes and densities on a plastic sheet to develop a mental picture of how the mass of an object influences how much effect it has on the surrounding space. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4G/M1, 12A/E1, 12D/M8
  • Mars By the Book

    This is an activity about similarities and differences between the Earth and Mars. Learners will investigate how Mars compares to the Earth, working together to create an Earth-Mars Comparison Poster to post in the program facility/library and share with their community. Their poster will feature basic facts about Mars and the Earth, as well as a scale model using balloons to represent the two planets. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 2 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 11B/E4, 12D/E8
  • Searching for Life

    This is an activity designed to develop a working definition of life. Learners will conduct a simple experiment, looking for signs of life in three different "soil" samples. The experiment introduces children to the difficulty that scientists face in defining life. By observing the soil samples, participants try to determine if any contain signs of life and work to identify, refine, and create a set of characteristics that may be used to identify living versus nonliving things. The activity concludes with the development of a group definition of life. This group definition will be referred to in subsequent activities. It also includes specific tips within each activity for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 1 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 5C/P2
  • Build an LRO

    This is an activity about the moon. Learners will create their own models of lunar orbiters out of edible or non-edible materials. They determine what tools would be necessary to help us better understand the Moon and plan for a future lunar outpost. Then they incorporate these elements into their models. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is used as an example of a spacecraft armed with "eyes," "ears," and other tools for exploration. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - a resource developed specifically for use in libraries.
  • Mission Moon!

    In this activity, learners work in teams to assess environmental conditions, resources, and scientific relevance of different locations on the Moon using data collected from previous lunar missions. Each team selects the site they believe has the best potential for a future lunar outpost. The teams debate their conclusions and work together to determine which single site to recommend to NASA. This activity takes approximately 1.5 hours, and can be divided into parts. Learners should be familiar with NASA's LRO Mission and the lunar environment through other Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! activities. These activities were developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 1B/M1b, 3A/M2, 3A/M3, 4B/H1
  • Build a Colony!

    In this activity, learners consider the requirements for human life beyond Earth's protection: air to breathe, plentiful food, shielding from ultraviolet light, power, etc. They then work in teams to design and construct a model of a space colony out of craft materials that would allow humans to survive the harsh environments of the Moon or Mars. Teams present their modules and colonies to one another and create a display for the library. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond! - developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/M2cd, 4B/H1, 5D/M1a, 12D/M9
  • Jump Start Jupiter

    This is a kick-off activity about the solar system and Jupiter. Learners will discuss what they know, work in teams to read about the Sun, eight planets, asteroid belt, and the dwarf planet, Pluto. They use their knowledge to create a poster about each object, which can be displayed in the library and used in later activities. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 12D/M9
  • Jump to Jupiter

    This is a lesson about the size and scale of the planets in the solar system. Learners will help create and then navigate an outdoor course of the traditional planets (including dwarf planet Pluto), which are represented by small common objects. By counting the jumps needed to reach each object, learners experience firsthand the vast scale of our solar system. The activity should be done in a large outdoor area. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
  • Planet Party

    Learners and their families are encouraged to go outside on a clear evening and view the sky to see the planets for themselves. Using sky charts and other resources, and possibly in partnership with a local astronomical society, children navigate the night sky and view planets with the naked eye and binoculars or telescopes. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
  • Neato-Magneto Planets

    This is an activity about magnetic fields. Learners will study magnetic fields at four separate stations: examining magnetic fields generated by everyday items, mapping out a magnetic field using a compass, creating models of Earth's and Jupiter's magnetic fields, and observing aurora produced by magnetic fields on both planets. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments. (Note: the activity was adapted for informal education from Magnetic Globe, by Sonoma State University, and Exploring Magnetism, by Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley)
  • My Trip to Jupiter

    In this concluding activity, children create a scrapbook or poster display documenting their trips to Jupiter. Learners will use their "My Trip to Jupiter" journals and select common craft items to represent the characteristics of each aspect or layer and summarize their findings. This activity is part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 12D/M9
  • Protecting Life:The Martian Challenge

    This module focuses on ultraviolet radiation on Earth and in space and how it affects life. Learners will construct their own "martian" using craft materials and UV beads. They will explore how UV radiation from the Sun can affect living things, comparing conditions on Earth and Mars, and then discuss ways in which organisms may protect themselves from UV radiation. They will then take part in a Mars Creature Challenge, where they will change their creature to help it survive harsh UV conditions — like on Mars. They will then test their Mars creatures by subjecting them to different environmental conditions to see how well they "survive" in a martian environment. This investigation will explore shelter and protection as one of life’s requirements and how Earth’s atmosphere protects life from harmful UV radiation. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 5 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/H1, 4F/M8
  • From Your Birthday to Jupiter's

    Learners will explore Jupiter's origins through three stories. First, they model their own lifetimes by tying knots in lengths of yarn to represent key events in their pasts. Then, children listen to and act out a cultural origins story, such as the Skytellers stories told by Native American master storytellers. Finally, they explore Jupiter's story by modeling a timeline from today back to its "birthday." They use the timeline to visually demonstrate that the Big Bang occurred much earlier in the past. Children will discover how the Juno mission to Jupiter will help unveil how our solar system - including Earth - came to be. The activities are from Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.
  • Live Tonight: The Planets!

    This activity is about viewing the planet Mars (and others) through a telescope. Learners will go outside on a clear evening to view the planets and other celestial bodies for themselves. Using sky charts and other resources, and possibly in partnership with a local astronomical society or club, children and their families view Mars with binoculars and/or telescopes. The children who have participated in the other Explore: Life on Mars? activities may serve as docents at this public, community event, sharing what they have done and learned about what life is, the requirements for life, and the possibility for life on Mars now — or in the past! It is recommended that the viewing event be paired with the hands-on experiment within the Searching for Life activity if space and time allow. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 8 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/E2
  • Mars From Above

    This is a set of three activities about how scientists study other worlds. Learners will explore and compare the features of Mars and Earth, discuss what the features suggest about the history of Mars, and create a model to help them understand how scientists view other worlds. The activities help to show why scientists are interested in exploring Mars for evidence of past life, and address the question: "Why are we searching for life on Mars?" It also includes specific tips within each activity for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 4 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M3, 4C/M1
  • Nurturing Life

    This is an activity about the requirements of life. Learners will explore what living things need to survive and thrive by creating and caring for a garden plot (outdoors where appropriate) or a container garden (indoors) at the program facility. The garden will be used to beautify the facility with plant life with many planting and landscaping options provided. Children will consider the requirements of living things, compare the surface conditions on Mars to those found on Earth, view images/video of a NASA Astrobiology Institute "garden" where astrobiologists are studying life under extreme conditions, and consider the similarities and differences in the type of life that would be possible on Mars as compared to their garden on Earth. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 3 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4B/M2cd, 5C/P2
  • Mars Engineering

    This activity focuses on the relationship between science of looking for life and the tools, on vehicles such as the Mars Rover, that make it possible. Learners will create their own models of a Mars rover. They determine what tools would be necessary to help them better understand Mars (and something about life on Mars/its habitability). Then they work in teams to complete a design challenge where they incorporate these elements into their models, which must successfully complete a task. Teams may also work together to create a large-scale, lobby-sized version that may be put on display in the library to engage their community. The activity also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 6 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M3, 3C/P1, 12C/P3
  • Mars Imaginings - The Story

    This activity focuses on how the search for life on Mars is portrayed in fiction and videos. Learners will consider depictions of Mars from science fiction books and video clips. As a group, children discuss what they know about Mars and compare their ideas with the way Mars and imaginary martians are presented in the science fiction works. They then use what they’ve learned to create their own Mars Science Fiction “Movie Trailer” Zines. It is recommended that this activity is preceded by two or three of the previous activities in the series so that the children will already have an understanding of what life needs and how Mars compares to Earth. This activity may be extended to serve as a tween and/or teen science fiction book club. It also includes specific tips for effectively engaging girls in STEM. This is activity 7 in Explore: Life on Mars? that was developed specifically for use in libraries.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 12D/P2
  • Supernova Explosions

    In this activity, students are reminded that the Universe is made up of elements and that the heavier elements are created inside of a star, as they learned in the "Elements and You" activity. They are introduced to the life cycle of a star and to the way in which a star's mass affects its process of fusion and eventual death. Students discuss the physical concept of equilibrium as a balancing of forces and observe an experiment to demonstrate what happens to a soda can when the interior and exterior forces are not in equilibrium. An analogy is made between this experiment and core collapse in stars, to show the importance of maintaining equilibrium in stars. Finally, students participate in an activity which demonstrates how mass is ejected from a collapsed star in a supernova explosion, thereby dispersing heavier elements throughout the Universe. This activity is part of a series that has been designed specifically for use with Girl Scouts, but the activities can be used in other settings. Most of the materials are inexpensive or easily found. It is recommended that a leader with astronomy knowledge lead the activities, or at least be available to answer questions, whenever possible.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/H2cd, 4A/H2ef
  • Black Hole Orbits

    Students are introduced to the basic properties, behavior and detection of black holes through a brief discussion of common conceptions and misconceptions of these exciting objects. They "act out" a way black holes might be detected through their interaction with other objects. In this activity, girls represent binary star systems in pairs, walking slowly around one another in a darkened room with each pair holding loops of wire to simulate the gravitational interaction. Most of the students are wearing glow-in-the-dark headbands to simulate stars, some are without headbands to represent black holes, and a small set of the black holes have flashlights to simulate X-ray emission. This activity is part of a series that has been designed specifically for use with Girl Scouts, but the activities can be used in other settings. Most of the materials are inexpensive or easily found. It is recommended that a leader with astronomy knowledge lead the activities, or at least be available to answer questions, whenever possible.
  • Here, There and Everywhere Poster Set

    This series of visual presentations illustrates common physics principles across vastly different scales, using human-scale photographs, earth science and astrophysics imagery. The products look at such topics as shadows, wind, bow waves and collisionally-excited gas. The intent is to show how familiar processes on Earth are connected to more exotic and less well-known phenomena across the Universe. These laws apply here (in daily life), there (around Earth and the Solar System), and everywhere (throughout the cosmos). The poster set is part of the Here, There, Everywhere (HTE) collection.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 1A/H1
  • Observing with NASA

    With this resource, users can control the ground-based MicroObservatory telescopes from their computer and download their images themselves, with no human intervention in the loop. Users can access the Observing With NASA "Control Telescope" web interface at anytime. The telescopes are weatherproof and do not require a dome for protection, and the "Control Telescope" software automatically lets users know which targets are up that night. Even first-time observers can control the instrument without dependence on a telescope operator or other outside experts.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/E2, 4A/H3, 10A/M2
  • Visions of the Universe: Four Centuries of Discovery

    This exhibit uses text and images to portray humanity's views of the universe and how they have evolved over time. It includes six two-sided panels that feature key astronomical discoveries from the past 400 years. The exhibit also highlights the technological advancements that made these discoveries possible. Exhibit topics range from celestial objects within our own "cosmic backyard" to those beyond the realm of our solar system. Featured objects include the sun, the moon, Saturn, Mars, comets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies. Images are accompanied by captions that highlight relevant, historical discoveries. Each exhibit panel is supported by supplemental resource materials available online in a downloadable, PDF format. Resource materials include science background information in the form of Q&As, related science misconceptions, a glossary, and links to additional resources on NASA's Amazing Space website. In addition, each exhibit panel is available as a downloadable, poster-size file.
  • Universe Discovery Guides

    These guides showcase education and public outreach resources from across more than 20 NASA astrophysics missions and programs. The twelve guides - one for each month - contain a science topic, an interpretive story, a sky object to view with finding charts, hands-on activities, and connections to NASA science. The guides are modular, so that educators can use the portions that are the most useful for their audiences/events. Following is the theme for each month: January - Betelgeuse, February - Orion Nebula, March - Pleiades, April - Pollux; May - Hubble Deep Field, June - Hercules Cluster, July - Ring Nebula & Veil Nebula, August - The Search for Habitable Worlds, September - Milky Way Galaxy, October - Upsilon Andromedae, November - Andromeda Galaxy, and December - Crab Nebula.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/M1bc, 4A/M2de, 4A/H2ab, 4A/H2ef, 4A/H6
  • Space School Musical

    "Join Hannah on a trip through the solar system in this ultra-cool edu-tainment “hip-hopera” that is out of this world! Move and groove along with the planets, moons, meteors, comets, asteroids and even some rockin’ scientists as they sing, dance and serve up the freshest facts in the galaxy. Space is definitely one cool place." This resource includes many activities that accompany the educational videos.
  • Telescopes: Eyes on the Universe Outreach Toolkit

    This manual provides an overview of how telescopes have changed our understanding of the universe and contains simple demonstrations to use at star parties to get across basic ideas of optics. This manual will also help explain why the images that folks see at the eyepiece of a telescope at an outreach star party is so different from images published in magazines. The manual was produced to accompany an outreach toolkit developed for the NASA Night Sky Network. The toolkit is no longer being manufactured, but the activities are available through the manual, which can be freely downloaded.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/E2
  • Constellations: Wonders Within

    This poster series highlights six astronomical images observed with NASA's Great Observatories (Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer) and found within the "From Earth to the Universe" (FETTU) exhibition. Each poster contains additional information on the historical context of the astronomical objects (constellation, view with the unaided eye), as well as basic facts about the specific object, the category of object, the NASA missions used, and the contributions to advancing knowledge of the universe enabled by the NASA observations. The materials expand on the theme of demonstrating how far understanding and knowledge have come since Galileo's telescope 400 years ago with illustrations of specific NASA contributions, provide background information on which informal educators can draw for NASA-related activities in their programming, and include student activities.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 3A/M2, 4A/H3
  • Supernova! Outreach Toolkit

    This toolkit includes PowerPoints and scripts, videos and accompanying activities and handouts about supernovae. Following are specific items in the kit: Supernova in the Lives of Stars PowerPoint and Script; Let's Make a Supernova (participants imagine themselves inside a large star at the end of its life, just as it is about to go supernova); Nuclear Fusion (a simple and engaging activity explains nuclear fusion and how radiation is generated by stars, using marshmallows as a model); Supernova Star Maps (allow visitors to experience finding stars in the night sky that will eventually go supernova); A Universe Without Supernovae (an active game to illustrate the value of supernovae in the universe); and Lives of Stars (an activity and handout about the lifecycle of stars and when supernovae happen.)
    AAAS Benchmarks: 4A/H2ef
  • Star Witness News: Hubble Reveals Orion in Picture Perfect Glory

    The article explains how an area in the constellation, Orion, called the Orion Nebula is a stellar nursery, where more than 3,000 stars are being born. Students read about why astronomers are interested in this region of space and how they go about studying the nebula. This science content reading identifies and defines scientific words and phrases that might be new to the student. The discussion questions with answers are available to help focus the student's attention on important information and to challenge the student to delve deeper into the subject of star formation. Star Witness is a series of articles that mirror the content of recent Hubble Space Telescope press releases.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 1B/M1b, 4A/E5
  • Comet on a Stick

    In this activity, learners replicate the scientific processes of observing, forming an explanation, revising and communicating about a model of a comet. Learners construct a model of features of a comet using an assortment of common craft supplies. This activity relates to several NASA comet missions such as Deep Impact, Stardust, Stardust-NExT, and EPOXI and can be used to emulate a process that scientists and engineers follow on all missions.
    AAAS Benchmarks: 11B/E3, 11B/E4, 11B/M5, 4A/M4
  • SciGirls Seven: How to Engage Girls in STEM - SciGirls CONNECT

    The SciGirls approach - for the TV show, website, and educational materials - is rooted in research about how to engage girls in STEM. A quarter of a century of studies have converged on a set of common strategies that work, and these have become SciGirls' foundation. SciGirls Seven recommends seven best practices. You can find out more about them and tips for how to implement them in your NASA Science4Girls events from the SciGirls website.
  • Engaging Girls in STEM | National Girls Collaborative Project

    A collection of publications summarizing research focused on what works to engage and support girls in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), from The National Girls Collaborative Project.
  • A practice guide for educators that includes specific recommendations for encouraging girls in the fields of math and science.