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Filters: Your search found 9 results.
Educational Level:
High school  
Instructional Strategies:
Cues, questions, and advanced organizers  
Discussions  
Topics/Subjects:
Engineering and technology  
Learning Time:
45 to 60 minutes  
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Now showing results 1-9 of 9

Students read and analyze four different articles about the NuSTAR mission discoveries regarding black holes. This activity is from the NuSTAR Educators Guide: X-Rays on Earth and from Space, which focuses on the science and engineering design of... (View More)

Keywords: Reading
Audience: High school
Materials Cost: Free

Learners will be introduced to the concepts of error analysis, including standard deviation. They will apply the knowledge of averages (means), standard deviation from the mean, and error analysis to their own classroom distribution of heights. They... (View More)

Learners will compare known elemental spectra with spectra of Titan and Saturn’s rings from a spectrometer aboard the NASA Cassini spacecraft. They identify the elements visible in the planetary and lunar spectra. The activity is part of Project... (View More)

Learners will use a spectrograph to gather data about light sources. Using the data they’ve collected, students are able to make comparisons between different light sources and make conjectures about the composition of a mystery light source. The... (View More)

Learners will look at various light sources (including glow sticks and Christmas lights) and make conjectures about their composition. The activity is part of Project Spectra, a science and engineering program for middle-high school students,... (View More)

Learners will build and decorate their own spectrographs using simple materials and holographic diffraction gratings. After building the spectrographs, they observe the spectra of different light sources. Requires advance preparation to spray-paint... (View More)

Using the diameter of a pencil as a reference, students calculate and construct a line chart to show the relative height of several altitudinal points such as Earth's atmosphere, the beginning of space, commercial airplane flights, and the Hubble... (View More)

Students will collect samples of particles in the air on simple slides they make themselves. They will classify, count and chart their findings, draw conclusions, make predictions, and compare their findings to other available data. Supplies needed... (View More)

In this activity serving as an introduction to remote sensing, students list what they remember seeing in a familiar environment, check their accuracy, and discuss the results. Then they apply their experiences and new skills to an unfamiliar... (View More)

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