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This model demonstrates convection currents and uses water, food coloring, a cup of very hot water and a votive candle as heat sources. Movie clips of demonstration setup and convection in action are provided. This activity is supported by a... (View More)

With this lesson plan, students observe a demonstration of cloud formation that uses a 2L plastic beverage bottle and other simple ingredients to learn the three factors required for cloud formation. A test and a control experiment are conducted.... (View More)

Sea floor spreading is demonstrated using a model consisting of two classroom desks and an 8-foot strip of paper. Changes in polarity are indicated using a felt marker. The investigation supports material presented in chapter 3, "What Heats the... (View More)

In this demonstration, a plastic soft drink bottle is used to demonstrate properties of gases and liquids with respect to temperature and pressure. Calculations using the formula for the Ideal Gas Law are included. The resource is from PUMAS -... (View More)

This is a lesson about the formation of plasma bubbles in Earth's ionosphere. Plasma bubbles cause stars to twinkle and radio signals from satellites to distort. Learners will build a model ionosphere in order to demonstrate and understand this... (View More)

In this activity, students compute the strengths of the gravitational forces exerted on the Moon by the Sun and by the Earth, and demonstrate the actual shape of the Moon's orbit around the Sun. The lesson begins with students' assumptions about the... (View More)

In this short demo/activity, a balloon with baking soda in it is stretched over the mouth of a flask or bottle containing vinegar. The balloon is tipped so that the baking soda falls into the vinegar, and the reaction creates carbon dioxide, which... (View More)

Students experiment with a model system made from a wooden block, sandpaper, a thumbtack, and a rubber band to understand earthquakes. In this system, the rubber band stores energy until it accumulates enough energy to overcome friction and move the... (View More)

In this demonstration, students learn how fiber optics work by observing a model using gelatin and observing how the internal reflection of light allows light to bend within the system. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the... (View More)

Students become familiar with strike-slip faults, normal faults, reverse faults and visualize these geological structures using cardboard or a plank of wood, a stack of books, protractor, and a spring scale. The resource is part of the teacher's... (View More)

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