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This iOS app for iPhone, iPad and iTouch, allows families and educators to investigate and learn about the Sun at home, at school, or anywhere. It provides 13 free, easy to use, hands-on activities, plus live images of the Sun from NASA's SDO... (View More)

This is an activity about the rotation of the Moon. Learners use a penny and a quarter to model that the Moon does indeed spin on its axis as it orbits the Earth. They find that the Moon keeps the same face toward the Earth, but receives... (View More)

Audience: Informal education
Materials Cost: Free

This is an activity about Lunar samples. Learners will see snapshots of the Moon's history and hold an important artifact of American history with a Lunar Sample Disk. Earth rocks and soil of similar types as the lunar samples may be provided and... (View More)

Audience: Informal education

This is an activity about the history of the Solar System. Learners work in groups to determine the order of geologic events - such as the formation of the Moon and when the bright crater of Tycho formed - and arrange images depicting those events... (View More)

Learners model how impacts throughout the Moon's history have broken rocks down into a mixture of dust, rocks, and boulders that covers the lunar surface. They consider how the dust will continue to hold a record of human exploration - in the form... (View More)

Audience: Informal education

Learners will model ancient lunar impacts using water balloons. By measuring the diameter of the crater area, they discover that the Moon's largest impact basins were created by huge asteroids. The huge basins formed on the young Moon, but through... (View More)

This lesson applies the science and math of the rotation of a sphere to water and wind movements on Earth. Students are introduced to convection, the Trade Winds and the Coriolis Force. Using an online visualizer, students generate trajectories and... (View More)

Audience: High school
Materials Cost: Free

This investigation demonstrates the applicability of images and geography to everyday life. Using an image of a large shopping mall in Huntsville, Alabama, as an example, students will analyze the location of the mall and use of the surrounding... (View More)

Remote sensing detects both human and physical features by using seven distinct image elements: tone, shape, size, pattern, texture, shadow and association. Students are introduced to each of these elements individually through images, descriptions... (View More)

Remote sensing offers three perspectives on human or physical features: aerial (birds-eye), oblique (angled) and ground-level. Sketching a classroom object from each of the three perspectives provides students with the foundation to then complete... (View More)

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