Filters: Your search found 8 results.
Math Standards:
No  
Topics/Subjects:
Earth history  
Sort by:
Per page:

Now showing results 1-8 of 8

This textbook chapter introduces the buffalo as a keystone species, and describes the environmental impacts of its near extinction, including today’s predominance of non-native species in the Great Plains. Human activities that contribute to... (View More)

This introductory textbook chapter presents data demonstrating decreased global biodiversity and its link to human activity. The resource includes a field-based student investigation of local biodiversity, links to current news articles, and an... (View More)

In this problem set, learners will analyze a table of the length of day (hours) and the number of days per year on Earth in past eras. They will calculate future values, plot some of the data and identify the rate of increase. Answer key is... (View More)

Keywords: Inquiry; Table analysis
Audience: Middle school, High school
Materials Cost: Free

This activity is designed to introduce students to planetary geologic features and processes. First, students will use NASA satellite images to identify geologic surface features on the "Blue Marble" (Earth), and will explore the connection between... (View More)

In this activity, students investigate sea level change during glacial maxima during the Ice Ages, and learn how lowered sea level presented additional routes for intercontinental human migration. Summary background information, data and images... (View More)

Audience: Elementary school, Middle school
Materials Cost: Free per student

This is a lesson about how and why ice flows, especially in a large mass such as a glacier. Learners will experience the qualities of viscoelastic materials and view videos of glacial ice flows. They will observe ice flows and materials other than... (View More)

This is a website about microbiology. Learners may explore information about microorganisms, extremophiles and extreme habitats, as well as the ecology, diversity and evolution of micro-organisms.

In this activity, students begin learning about archaeoastronomy much as the first skywatchers began learning about the sky: by observing and wondering. Students observe photographs and drawings of petroglyphs, pictographs, and natural and... (View More)

1