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Source:
University of California, Berkeley  
Materials Cost:
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Learners will make a Sun tracker to explore how ancient civilizations around the world studied the Sun. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 7 and up. It requires a bright sunny day.

Learners will make scale models of the Sun and Earth out of paper mache. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 10 and up.

Learners will use thermometers and a lamp to investigate why some places on Earth’s surface are much hotter than others. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 10 and up.

On a bright, sunny day, learners will use tonic water to detect ultraviolet (UV) light from the Sun. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 7 and up

Learners will use binoculars or a telescope to identify and track sunspots. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 10 and up. It requires a bright sunny day.

Learners will make a pinhole viewer, and use it to measure the Sun’s size. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 10 and up. It requires a bright sunny day.

Learners will make a prism to separate sunlight into different colors. This activity is from the DIY Sun Science app and is for ages 10 and up. It requires a bright sunny day.

This is a make-it-yourself planisphere designed to show where Kepler is pointing. Learners can use it to locate exoplanets around stars in the night sky. It comes with two wheels: one with coordinate grid for plotting additional exoplanet stars and... (View More)

In this inquiry activity, teams of students are challenged with engineering a greenhouse heat trap for use with exotic plants. The investigation requires thermometers, plastic wrap, and a shoebox for each team. Students graph data and determine the... (View More)

In this simulation activity, students experiment with a population of M&M candies or paper dot "beetles" to test how well each color is adapted to survive on a field of colorful wrapping paper or fabric. Students act as predators and see that... (View More)